Home > Blog > Archive: March 2013

Join the fight to save our mothers & babies: The MamaYe Model

“Childbirth is not a disease. We have known for decades what it takes to ensure the survival of women and their babies in childbirth. But if our mothers are to survive, then the Ghanaian public must step up, and become more involved and vigilant."— Prof. Richard Adanu, Country Director for Mama Ye Ghana.

The power of “Blood”

Feika Ibrahim, a Health for All Coalition hospital monitor recalls an experience that greatly influenced his decision to become a regular blood donor.

MamaYe: Paying Homage To Our Mothers

In the labor ward She labored for a great reward The cry of the baby gives her The gladness which takes away the bitterness The happiness which engulfs us when We hear 'wawo afa neho afa neba" The family reunion kpojiem) brings The beauty of motherhood Is the first step of procreation.

"Going beyond the rhetoric" - Ghanaians give blood for mothers and babies on International Women's day

It was an exciting, and yet, a very humbling occasion when over 400 people converged at the Efua Sutherland Park (Children’s Park) in Accra on Friday to voluntarily donate blood as part of the MamaYe Campaign to make available more blood for Ghana's mothers and babies.

Kano State Health Commissioner Lauds MamaYe

MamaYe Nigeria recently earned another feather for its cap when the commissioner for health in Kano State, Dr Abubakar Labaran, commended Evidence for Action (E4A), the organisation behind the MamaYe campaign, for utilising existing data to advocate for improved accountability, planning and decision making in the health sector.

Mothers, children require nearly 190,000 pints of blood every year

Statistics from the Ghana Health Service reveal that loss of blood during delivery (haemorrhage) is the leading cause of maternal deaths in Ghana. Out of the 250,000 pints of blood needed yearly, mothers and children require 75 percent (187,500 pints) but only 66 percent is obtained.